What makes RAYOS different?

RAYOS is the first and only delayed-release form of prednisone

You may already be familiar with prednisone. It’s used to treat many diseases and conditions, especially those associated with inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), lupus, and others.

RAYOS works like traditional prednisone but is different because of its unique delayed-release formulation. This means the prednisone dose releases about 4 hours after you take RAYOS.

Select Important Safety Information

The most common side effects with RAYOS are water retention, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, unusual behavior and mood changes, increased appetite, and weight gain.

When taken at bedtime, RAYOS starts working while you sleep to align with the natural cycles of your body

Inflammation caused by RA follows a regular pattern, called a circadian rhythm—the body’s daily cycle of biological activities:

  • Inflammatory activity rises overnight and is the highest during the early morning hours
  • That’s why the symptoms of RA, like joint pain, swelling, and stiffness, are commonly most severe when you wake up in the morning

RAYOS starts working while you sleep to align with the natural cycles of your body RAYOS starts working while you sleep to align with the natural cycles of your body RAYOS starts working while you sleep to align with the natural cycles of your body

2 am may be an appropriate time to take prednisone for RA so it works with your body’s circadian rhythms, but it may be inconvenient to take medicine at that time


Taking delayed-release RAYOS at bedtime releases medicine overnight to deliver relief when your body needs it most

RAYOS has not been studied against immediate-release prednisone.

See how a bedtime dose of RAYOS can help reduce the duration of morning stiffness

Efficacy & Safety

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not use RAYOS if you are allergic to prednisone.

Long-term use of RAYOS can affect your hormones and one of the ways your body responds to stress. Symptoms, among others, can include weight gain, changes in body appearance (particularly the face), severe fatigue, weak muscles, and high blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after taking RAYOS.

RAYOS can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or have recently had. Signs and symptoms of infection may be hidden. Tell your doctor if you have had a recent or ongoing infection or if you have been exposed to chickenpox or measles.

RAYOS can cause high blood pressure, salt and water retention, and low blood potassium. Your doctor should monitor these levels.

There is an increased risk of developing perforations in the stomach or intestines if you have certain stomach and intestinal disorders. Signs and symptoms may be hidden.

Behavior and mood changes can occur, including intense excitement or happiness, sleeplessness, mood swings, personality changes, severe depression, and psychosis. Existing conditions may become worse.

Long-term use of RAYOS can cause decreases in bone density. You should talk with your doctor about this risk before you initiate therapy, particularly if you are postmenopausal. Your doctor should monitor bone density with long-term therapy.

RAYOS can cause cataracts, eye infections, and glaucoma. Your doctor should monitor eye pressure if you use RAYOS for more than 6 weeks.

Do not receive a “live” vaccine while taking RAYOS. The vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease. Tell your doctor if you have recently received a vaccine.

Taking RAYOS during pregnancy can harm an unborn baby.

RAYOS may be present in breast milk; discuss the risks and benefits of breastfeeding while taking RAYOS with your doctor.

Long-term use of RAYOS can slow growth and development in children. Children on long-term therapy should be monitored for this.

The most common side effects with RAYOS are water retention, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, unusual behavior and mood changes, increased appetite, and weight gain.

Talk to your doctor before you stop taking RAYOS. You may need to gradually reduce the amount of RAYOS you are taking. Stopping RAYOS suddenly may cause unwanted side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about RAYOS with your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Click here for the full Prescribing Information.

Approved uses of RAYOS

RAYOS, a corticosteroid, is an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agent used in the treatment of many different conditions, such as certain allergic, skin, stomach and intestinal, blood, eye, nerve, kidney, breathing, rheumatologic, and specific infectious diseases or conditions, and organ transplantation. RAYOS is used in the treatment of certain endocrine conditions and to ease the symptoms, including pain, of certain cancer conditions.

For a complete list of indications for RAYOS, please see full Prescribing Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not use RAYOS if you are allergic to prednisone.

Long-term use of RAYOS can affect your hormones and one of the ways your body responds to stress. Symptoms, among others, can include weight gain, changes in body appearance (particularly the face), severe fatigue, weak muscles, and high blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after taking RAYOS.

RAYOS can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or have recently had. Signs and symptoms of infection may be hidden. Tell your doctor if you have had a recent or ongoing infection or if you have been exposed to chickenpox or measles.

RAYOS can cause high blood pressure, salt and water retention, and low blood potassium. Your doctor should monitor these levels.

There is an increased risk of developing perforations in the stomach or intestines if you have certain stomach and intestinal disorders. Signs and symptoms may be hidden.

Behavior and mood changes can occur, including intense excitement or happiness, sleeplessness, mood swings, personality changes, severe depression, and psychosis. Existing conditions may become worse.

Long-term use of RAYOS can cause decreases in bone density. You should talk with your doctor about this risk before you initiate therapy, particularly if you are postmenopausal. Your doctor should monitor bone density with long-term therapy.

RAYOS can cause cataracts, eye infections, and glaucoma. Your doctor should monitor eye pressure if you use RAYOS for more than 6 weeks.

Do not receive a “live” vaccine while taking RAYOS. The vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease. Tell your doctor if you have recently received a vaccine.

Taking RAYOS during pregnancy can harm an unborn baby.

RAYOS may be present in breast milk; discuss the risks and benefits of breastfeeding while taking RAYOS with your doctor.

Long-term use of RAYOS can slow growth and development in children. Children on long-term therapy should be monitored for this.

The most common side effects with RAYOS are water retention, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, unusual behavior and mood changes, increased appetite, and weight gain.

Talk to your doctor before you stop taking RAYOS. You may need to gradually reduce the amount of RAYOS you are taking. Stopping RAYOS suddenly may cause unwanted side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088

The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about RAYOS with your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Click here for the full Prescribing Information.

Approved uses of RAYOS

RAYOS, a corticosteroid, is an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agent used in the treatment of many different conditions, such as certain allergic, skin, stomach and intestinal, blood, eye, nerve, kidney, breathing, rheumatologic, and specific infectious diseases or conditions, and organ transplantation. RAYOS is used in the treatment of certain endocrine conditions and to ease the symptoms, including pain, of certain cancer conditions.

For a complete list of indications for RAYOS, please see full Prescribing Information.